Press Advisory: ACTIVISTS TO PROTEST ON 30 CAMPUSES, OCCUPY THE CAPITOL IN SACRAMENTO TO MAKE BANKS & MILLIONAIRES PAY TO REFUND EDUCATION

***MEDIA ADVISORY FOR MARCH 1ST AND MARCH 5TH***

 CONTACT:

Ben Wyskida, 917-825-1289 // ben@berlinrosen.com

See below for local event contacts

 ACTIVISTS TO PROTEST ON 30 CAMPUSES, OCCUPY THE CAPITOL IN SACRAMENTO TO MAKE BANKS & MILLIONAIRES PAY TO REFUND EDUCATION

 Thousands of Students, Parents, Teachers and Workers Call on Governor Brown to Support Millionaires Tax and End Talks on New Tuition Increases and Cuts

 

SACRAMENTO – With California leading the nation in tuition increases after years of cuts, thousands of students, teachers, parents, and workers – will kick off a week of actions, rallies and events to make the 1% pay to refund education, jobs, essential services, and a better future for the next generation.

The week will kick off on March 1st with over 30 on-campus actions across the state (see list of actions below) and culminate on March 5th when thousands of activists will descend on Sacramento to Occupy the Capitol.  In between, dozens of activists will undertake a 99 Mile March to Sacramento, beginning in Oscar Grant Plaza in Oakland at 2pm on Thursday, March 1st.

These actions are the followup to ReFund California’s November actions, where tens of thousands protested statewide to make the banks pay to refund higher education. Those protests helped stop any tuition hikes in the UC system for the 2011-2012 academic year. This week of action reflects growing momentum for ReFund California’s policy solutions and calls to make the 1% pay.

Monday, March 5 ”Occupy the Capital” events in Sacramento

10am: Mass March on the Capitol Building, Beginning at South Side Park in Sacramento

11am: Rally at the Capitol Building

3:30pm: General Assembly and Nonviolent Direct Action Training

5:30pm: Permitted rally in support of Occupy the Capitol!

“We’ve had a 300% increase in tuition because millionaires and Wall Street corporations have used loopholes and politics to avoid paying taxes.  With few good jobs out there, we can’t afford to take on more student debt.  Yet college and university executives are trying to get a budget deal with Governor Brown to increase tuition by as much as 24%.  We call on the Governor to reject this deal and instead support the Millionaire’s tax.  It’s time to make the 1% refund education, jobs, and a better future for the next generation” said CSU Fresno student Chucho Mendoza.

The effort is supported by Refund California, a statewide coalition of students, teachers, homeowners, and faith leaders working to make Wall Street the 1% pay to solve the economic crisis they created. 

ReFund California is calling on Governor Jerry Brown to:

  • End talks about any budget deal that includes tuition hikes or education cuts
  • Instead, support the passage of California’s Millionaires Tax of 2012 -- the only viable initiative that will generate more $1.5 billion in new revenue for colleges and universities without making ordinary Californians pay a single dime more in taxes.  The millionaires tax will provide $6 billion in new revenue overall for education, vital services, and infrastructure.

FOLLOW THE PROTESTS ONLINE:

Twitter – Follow @ReFundCA and the hashtag #occupythecapitol

Facebook – “Like” Make Banks Pay California for updates, links, pictures, and videos.

Web – www.refundcalifornia.org or http://occupyeducationca.org

Text Updates: Text “REFUND ED” to 415-689-7538

March 1st Event Details : Locally organized events will take place on over 20 campuses around the state.  Each event will be different, but all events will focus on the need to stop tuition increases, prevent cuts and make the 1% pay to ReFund Education.  Listed below are three of the highest profile events. The full list of events happening around the state can be found at:  www.refundcalifornia.org/march01

UC Berkeley

Contact: Carla West, mgaladelicious@yahoo.com, 510-379-0532

8am – 12pm       Open University   California Hall

12 noon                Rally, Sproul Plaza

12:45pm               March to Oscar Grant Plaza

Note: This will also be the kickoff of the “99 Mile March,” where dozens of activists will begin a multi-day at Grant Plaza which will culminate with the Occupy the Capitol events in Sacramento on March 5th.

UCLA    

Contact: Erin Conley, 620-757-5950, ebconley@gmail.com         

12pm-8pm Wilson Plaza, UCLA

There will be a full day of teach-ins, performances, speak-out, a general assembly and camping at the Bruin Bear            

Noon:                   food-sharing, creative space, and performance

1pm-4pm:           Teach outs (the budget, Palestine, know your rights, student union models, student/worker organizing)

4pm-5pm:           Free School - first meeting

5pm:                      Teach out - fighting FBI surveillance

6pm:                      General assembly

8pm:                      Film screening: Berkeley in the 60's

Night:                    Camping at the Bruin Bear

City College of San Francisco & San Francisco State University 
Stephan Georgiou, 631 793-5253, stephan.georgiou@gmail.com    
San Francisco 8 AM - 2 PM    
8am:                      Occupy CCSF students will create stations around campus to speak to students about the day and week ahead.
10am:                    Art station at RAM Plaza on campus to create signs for the state action later in the day.
12:30pm:             Students to walk out of class and converge at RAM Plaza for a 1pm rally
1pm:                      RAM Plaza Rally will feature AFT Local 2121 President Alisa Messer, 99 Mile marchers, and Poetry for the People.
1pm:                      Occupy SFSU students will march from their campus to CCSF fto join RAM Plaza Rally
3pm:                      Teach-in and occupation at the California State Office Building (455 Golden Gate Avenue)
4pm -                    6pm: Mass rally at San Francisco Civic Center

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ABOUT US: ReFUND California is a coalition of organizations throughout California committed to exposing the unfairness of the state’s current economic reality and engaging in public campaigns to force the changes that are necessary.

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